FAME India – Phase 2: Lack of Success in the Face of Policy Deficiencies

 By Keerthana Chavaly, Lady Shri Ram College for Women, New Delhi.

Phase 2 of FAME India, which is a part of the National Electric Mobility Mission Plan (NEMMP) 2020, aims to reinvigorate the push for clean energy and address the drawbacks of Phase 1 by increasing the use of environmentally friendly electric vehicles through investing Rs. 10,000 crores for a period of three years (2019-2022). In June 2015, the government kick started a scheme called Faster Adoption and Manufacturing of (Hybrid and) Electric Vehicles in India (FAME India). The scheme aimed to increase the use of electric vehicles in the country by implementing a policy that would raise the demand for environmentally friendly vehicles. The policy focused on the auto sector, with Phase 1 of the scheme intending to develop infrastructure and promote technologies that would be required for increased and sustained production of electric vehicles (EVs). However, the results of Phase 1 have not been entirely positive – reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and fuel targets have not been met.

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Social Policies in India: Evolving Causes and Effects

By Viswanadha Modali, Australian National University, Canberra.

To understand the evolution and impact of social policies in India, we must first define the often misunderstood term “social policy”. The London School of Economics very succinctly defines it as a policy ‘concerned with the ways societies across the world meet human needs for security, education, work, health and well being’. Given that the term has a very broad and elusive definition, it brings under its purview a very wide range of government policies impacting several facets of human life.  (more…)

The Feat of Ecologically Sensitive Urbanisation: What India can learn from its Asian peers

By Riya Mathur, SRCC, New Delhi.

Given that the purpose of urbanization for any developing country is to produce highly efficient urban areas for better consumption and efficient management of resources and ensuring public welfare, India needs a concrete structure to embark on this journey. In a time when rural to urban migration is high and the consequential environmental degradation concerns the policy makers, the aim of a truly urbanized country seems difficult to achieve. With all that it faces today, it is only apt to not just consider where India’s urban planning went wrong but also how these mistakes can be addressed in a way to strategize as to what the country can do to better its policies in the face of ecological challenges that accompany massive urbanization. The best way to do this would be to compare India’s practices with those of its peers which consist of similar assets and face similar challenges. 

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Ethanol Production in India: Green Fuel Policy for a Cleaner Future

By Prachi Mishra, Vellore Institute of Technology, Vellore & Riya Mathur, SRCC, Delhi.

The growing global consciousness in regard to the impending doom of climate change, has finally managed to startle governments and policy makers to endorse sustainable legislation. In most developing countries, fuel for industry, commute and domestic usage alike makes up the largest part of emissions, making fuel policy an area of targeted attention. Bio-Fuels and subsequent techniques like ethanol blending of petroleum are avenues of great potential for achieving greater fuel efficiency and environment sustainability.

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Civic Architects: The Policy Generation Group

In a democracy, people and their well being is at the core of an exemplary public policy mechanism, which is why proactive mass action can determine the fate of the policies that the State formulates. It is thus crucial that people demand sustainable solutions for existing concerns that deserve carefully crafted policies.

We believe that in the world’s largest democracy, effective public participation can turn policy making into a transparent and accountable process where the government can acknowledge issues that people heed and demand to be resolved. 

In our endeavour to unravel the complexity of Public Policy and expand the scope of public awareness and education in policy making, we are organising ‘Civic Architects’, a first of its kind Policy Workshop, in collaboration with The Economics Society, SRCC. (more…)

An Insight into India’s Wage Policies

The government’s intent to strengthen the minimum wage policies through the “Codes on Wages”, 2019 is noteworthy, but it fails to uplift the lives of the workforce as desired. Through the analysis of various wage policies of India, we can point out two major drawbacks in our present policies. One, lack of coordination among State and Central Government and two, lack of rigour on enforcement. Resolving these issues is imperative for the workforce to reap the benefits of India’s growing economy. For efficient enforcement, structural reforms in each sector are necessary as it will help employers to adapt to the changes in minimum wage policies.

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Sexuality Education in India: Curriculum in the Sheets, Silence in the Streets

Given the exponential level of population growth, and the fact that India is a developing nation with limited resources, there is an imminent need to reduce the population explosion. One way to go about it is by family planning. Another more effective way of going about it is by educating children about the various methods of contraceptives, reproductive health, and the consequences of sex.

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Activism in Policy Making: Creating Socio Political Change

By Keerthana Chavaly, Lady Shri Ram College for Women, New Delhi & Gargi Kothiyal, Graphic Era (Deemed University), Dehradun

Public policy can be defined as ‘government action to address public issues’. It is essentially a government decision undertaken to pursue a certain goal or objective which may or may not be enforceable at the Central, State or local level of governance. Policy-making thus remains a dynamic process which is changing dramatically with the increased involvement of different stakeholders. Given the multiple voices of different stakeholders at various levels of policy-making, it is necessary for civil society to be proactive and create spaces for people’s involvement in public policy. One way of ensuring that people’s voices are heard and determine the fate of policy-making has been through activism.

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Disha Bill, 2019: Deterrence for Sexual Offenders?

By Yash Jain, WB National University of Juridical Sciences, Kolkata

Awakened by the heinous and brutal rape in the outskirts of Hyderabad that shook the entire country and made the legislatures realize the need for strict and stringent laws for the punishment of rape and other sexual offences, the Andhra Pradesh Assembly passed the Disha Bill, 2019. The Bill, derives its name from the given name to the victim, a veterinary doctor who was raped and murdered in the incident. Also known as the AP Criminal Law (Amendment) Act, 2019, this Bill seeks to amend the provisions of the Code of Criminal Procedure (CrPC), 1973, for ‘heinous offences of rape’ and the Indian Penal Code, 1860, to strengthen the provisions relating to crimes against women and children. 

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Ecologically Sensitive Urbanization in India: Lessons from Europe

By Ishita Puri, St Xavier’s College, Mumbai.

Urbanization spurs a unique set of issues for both human and ecological well being, blemished by economic disparity and environmental degradation. In developing countries like India, urban spaces are the motors of the economy and generators of wealth. While it is difficult for a resource-rich and densely populated India to sustainably fulfill the loft demands of urbanization for food, energy and water and accommodation of increasing waste and emissions, certain efficacious models adopted by European countries can highlight the way forward.

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