Uniform Civil Code: Towards Gender Justice

By Dishari Chakrabarti, School of Law, KIIT University.

Politics of our nation has become so ingrained in pacification with specific sections of the society that our fundamental right of free speech and expression cannot be protected by the State. As a consequence of this appeasement the level of tolerance has reduced and which resulted in complete disregard for the law of the country. (more…)

Should Juvenile Justice Law be changed?

By Madhvi Chopra, VIPS, GGSIPU, New Delhi.

A “juvenile” means a person who has not completed eighteen years of age. A boy or girl under eighteen years of age is a “juvenile” according to the Juvenile Justice Act (JJA), 2000.

Earlier, according to the JJA, 1986, the age of boys and girls were different, but however, the JJA 2000 which repealed the JJA, 1986, brought the age of male juveniles at par with the female juveniles. Another reason for increasing the age of male juveniles by the JJA 2000 is to bring the Indian juvenile legislation into conformity with the ‘United Nation’s Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC)’. Article 1 of CRC states for the purposes of the present Convention, a child means every human being below the age of eighteen years unless under the law applicable to the child, majority is attained earlier. Therefore, both the boys and girls below the age of eighteen years enjoy the protection of juvenile legislation. (more…)

Dual Citizenship in India: Advantages

By Stuti Saxena, IGNOU, Delhi.

Citizenship in India is administered under the statutory provisions of the Citizenship Act, 1955, which has been amended from time to time. Further to this, Indian Constitution also enshrines the tenets of Citizenship in its Part II. India follows the system of single citizenship. As per Indian nationality law, jus sanguinis (citizenship by right of blood) in contrast with jus soli (citizenship by right of birth within the territory) is the norm. (more…)

LGBT Rights in India

By Nikhil Nair, VIPS, New Delhi.

LGBT is a common term used to describe people who are Lesbians, Gay, Bisexuals and Transgender. The ambit of LGBT also sometimes widens up to include non-heterosexuals. A large population in India is homophobic. Being a part of the LGBT community is considered to be a sin for them. People belonging to such communities are considered as outcastes and outlaws by some. This majorly has to do with the mindset of the majority Indian population who consider sexual activities within the same sex as against the law of nature. (more…)

Decriminalisation of Suicide

By Riya Singh, New Law College, BVP, Pune.

Suicide has been declared as a crime in many countries. Most of the western countries have already decriminalised individual suicides, calling it a defiant act. Hence, it is discouraged in every possible way. In countries like Rome and Japan it was seen as a kind of defiant act that violates the personal freedom. A person who commits suicide is not within the reach of law; the problem arises in matters like corpse of the person, distribution of his property. His family members have to suffer a lot. This matter has been covered by legislation of some countries. (more…)

Belief versus Knowledge

“I think that anyone who has taken the trouble to examine his, or her, own mind in regard to their worldly knowledge on any matter, will agree that this knowledge is entirely based on experience, but when we turn our attention to religion we immediately feel either that actual knowledge is lacking or that it is confined to certain instances of an entirely different nature…”

It has been written that “In all the world there are only two kinds of people – those who know, and those who do not know;and this knowledge is the thing which matters.” However sweeping this statement may appear it is little short of truth from the stand point of Religion in its real sense. (more…)

Faith, Taste and History by Aldous Huxley

“…a church once condemned by the Supreme Court as an organized rebellion, but now a monolith of respectability; a passionately loyal membership distinguished, even in these middle years of the twentieth century, by the old-fashioned Protestant and pioneering virtues of self-reliance and mutual aid—together, these make up a tale which no self-respecting reader even of Spillane, even of science fiction, should be asked to swallow. And yet, in spite of its total lack of plausibility, the tale happens to be true.”

Among tall stories, surely one of the tallest is the history of Mormonism. A founder whose obviously homemade revelations were accepted as more-than-gospel truth by thousands of followers; a lieutenant and successor who was “for daring a Cromwell, for intrigue a Machiavelli, for executive force a Moses, and for utter lack of conscience a Bonaparte”; a body of doctrine combining the most penetrating psychological insights with preposterous history and absurd metaphysics; a society of puritanical but theater-going and music-loving po-lygamists; a church once condemned by the Supreme Court as an organized rebellion, but now a monolith of respectability; a passionately loyal membership distinguished, even in these middle years of the twentieth century, by the old-fashioned Protestant and pioneering virtues of self-reliance and mutual aid—together, these make up a tale which no self-respecting reader even of Spillane, even of science fiction, should be asked to swallow. And yet, in spite of its total lack of plausibility, the tale happens to be true. (more…)