Sustainable Livelihood through Education-The Way Forward for the Northern Hilly Areas

Ever increasing consumption, rapid growth in population and modern production systems have resulted in greater demand for natural resources. Hilly areas of Northern India are particularly vulnerable to the consequences of climate change and indiscriminate exploitation of nature, as they are rich sources of biodiversity and natural resources. In these challenging times, sustainability is the way forward for these areas and sustainable livelihood is an important component of it. (more…)

India running out of Air: Can we rescue the Air (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act, 1981?

India’s toxic air has led to a health as well as an economic crisis. As per the World Bank, India lost 8.5% GDP in 2013 due to air pollution, which roughly amounts to $221 billion; the situation has only worsened in the last 6 years. India has some Acts and Programs in place to prevent and control air pollution. The Air (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act, 1981 was conceptualized to fight the degrading environmental situation in the country. But it has been rendered ineffective in its objective. Essential requirements to overhaul the Air Act, to turn it into an effective and strong legislation have been discussed in this paper. (more…)

The curious case of Punjab Preservation of Subsoil Water Act, 2009 and Air Pollution

By Akshat Jain, Madras School of Economics, Tamil Nadu.

India is going through a period that can be regarded as its worst environmental crisis. The air quality index in India is worsening with every passing day. 7 of the world’s 10 most polluted cities are in India. Many reasons have been cited for the plummeting Air Quality Index in north Indian cities; the most prominent amongst which is the burning of the stubble by farmers in Punjab, Haryana and Uttar Pradesh. In Punjab alone, which accounts for more than 50% of cases of stubble burning during the Diwali period, there have been 48,155 recorded cases of stubble burning from September to November, 2019.  (more…)

Solid Waste Management in India’s Mega Cities: Crossroads for Smarter Cities

India’s metropolitan cities are often touted for their superior development models. However, when it comes to the subject of Solid Waste Management (SWM), the status quo is particularly severe in the four major Indian cities. This Policy Brief examines the status of Solid Waste Management in the cities of Delhi, Mumbai, Bengaluru & Chennai while pointing out the city-specific challenges as well as policies. To approach the subject of SWM especially concerning our biggest cities, the paper also encompasses a range of policy recommendations, that can improve the health of SWM in India’s biggest urban quarters. (more…)

Rusting of a ‘migrant’ magnet: The severe ecological consequences of population influx on Delhi-NCR

By Shaunak Kishor Tapaskar, National Rail & Transportation Institute, Vadodara.

Migration is considered as a prime feature of today’s globalized world. People migrate from their places of origin to aspire for a safe and better future. In India, especially in its National Capital Region (NCR), we come across a similar phenomenon. NCR is the world’s largest urban agglomeration (UA) with a population of about 46 million. This region comprises of prominent cities like Delhi, Gurugram, Noida, and Ghaziabad. Among them, Delhi is the most populous with 18.6 million people and is also known as the National Capital Territory (NCT). Delhi’s booming services economy and its hegemony as the city with the highest per capita income in India makes it the migrant magnet. According to the 2011 census, nearly 40% of Delhi’s population comprised of outside individuals, which is the largest share among Indian cities, making it the ‘migrant capital’ of India. It also has the second largest population for inter-state migration, trailing only behind the state of Maharashtra. In Delhi, more than 75% of the total migrants are from the two states of Uttar Pradesh and Bihar. Among the Indian states, the share of migrants from Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Jharkhand, and Uttarakhand towards Delhi and its surrounding NCR consistently increased between 1991 and 2011. (more…)

The City of Imbalance: The Burden of Population and Ecological Crisis in Mumbai

Mumbai’s urban population is fast growing and problems of water availability, waste management and congestion are going to get more complex in future. Real estate development, Airport development project, Mumbai-Ahmedabad bullet train project, to name a few, are all meant to elevate the standard of life for an average citizen, however, their individual and collective consequences for the city’s air quality, water reserves and potential for sustainable land use draw a dismal picture. (more…)

Symposium on Public Policy: Urbanisation and Environmental Policies

LexQuest Foundation is organizing an immersive one-day public policy symposium, for students and young professionals.

The Symposium aims to reflect on the environmental policies and analyze their impact concerning the contemporary urban growth landscape of our country. The discussions and presentations will focus on the need to better the present legislative framework and to fill the prevalent policy gaps.  (more…)