Right to Internet vis à vis Right to Primary Education in the NCT of Delhi

Information about the issue:

In the last few months, COVID-19 has surfaced as an unprecedented challenge for the issue of access to quality education, especially for primary school students in government schools. For most of the students in government primary schools belonging to the disadvantaged communities, absence of computers, smartphones or any reliable broadband service means failure to access the e-learning tools that have proved to be indispensable in the event of the lockdown. With the proven necessity of access to the internet for access to education, lack of government intervention has highlighted the scale of poor access to the internet and its adverse consequences for access to primary education.  (more…)

The Trafficking of Persons (Prevention, Protection, and Rehabilitation) Bill, 2018: Rescued or Victimized into Rehabilitation?

Human trafficking has plagued society for ages. It is the usage of force and exploitation of individuals for purposes such as slavery, sex work, and other illegal activities translating into an infringement on an individual’s human rights, with women and children being those at the highest risk of being victims of trafficking. Every country that acts as an origin, intermediary, or final place of the process is considered as one that harbors this socio-economic evil. The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) has stressed the importance of legislation as a means to curb the practice of human trafficking. It has stated the need for member countries to implement domestic laws. It also recommends that these laws be flexible in nature and comprehensive in definition to aid their efficiency. (more…)

Bride Trafficking: Policy Interventions for an Under-Reported Plague

Bride trafficking is the illegal industry of purchasing brides as a property for due consideration. Organized traffickers sell girls and women as brides who are conned into a life of abuse, exploitation and slavery. Be it Haryana, Assam or Rajasthan, the Indian “Bride Bazaar” predominantly flourishes in parts of the country where the sex ratio is abysmally low and poverty stricken families are reluctant to spend on the dowry and marriage of their daughters. Unfortunately, there are no significant laws and policies to wrestle bride trafficking and its accompanying human rights violations in India. (more…)

The Ordeal of Manual Scavenging: Tracing the Evolution of India’s Mitigation Policies

By Khushi Pamnani, Research Associate, Human Rights and Social Justice Policies

The UN defines manual scavenging as the practice of manually cleaning, carrying, disposing or handling in any manner, human excreta from dry latrines and sewers. Upon collection of the excreta in containers like thin boards, baskets, and buckets, manual scavengers are then responsible to carry them on their heads to locations that are several kilometers away from the latrines. The demand for manual scavenging still persists due to a lack of functional and sanitary sewage systems. 

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UAPA Bill 2019

UAPA Bill, 2019 : Towards a terror free country or a flawed path?

By Tanu Singh, Ramjas College, New Delhi.

Union Home Minister Amit Shah put forward a Bill on 9 July 2019, proposing amendments in the Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act (UAPA), 1967. On 24 July the Bill was passed in the Lok Sabha. The Rajya Sabha cleared the Bill with 147 voting in favour and 42 against. UAPA, implemented in 1967, is an Act ‘to provide for the more effective prevention of certain unlawful activities of individuals and associations and for matters connected therewith’. It assigns absolute power to the Central Government, by way of which, if the Centre deems an activity as unlawful then it may, by way of an Official Gazette, declare it so. (more…)

Right to Disconnect: A Statutory Requirement?

By Shloka Suda, School of Law, UPES, Dehradun.

During the last 25 years, there has been a drastic improvement in the modes of communication, every person carrying a cellular device is just a phone call away, letters are written via email, the transmission of messages takes place in seconds through means of the internet. In the wake of advancements in technology, it has become increasingly difficult for a person to separate professional life from personal life. This “problem” has been recognized by the International Labour Organisation, as the said situation has only led to increased responsibility and accountability on the Employee. Any person who wants to give a 100% at his job invariably ends up spending all of his day working, which leads to a degradation in the quality of their life. In order to protect employees from this complication and to maintain the distinction between work and home, a need for “The Right to Disconnect” has been acknowledged. The Right to Disconnect essentially empowers the employee to not respond to any work-related queries post designated work hours. (more…)

Civic Architects: Bride Trafficking

A day full of insights, intense discussions and revelations for our participants and us, while we tried to make sense of the gender disparity, gender inequity and commodification of women’s minds and bodies in the society that contribute to the complex landscape of Bride Trafficking in India. Of learnings, solutions and thought provoking debates at Civic Architects: The Policy Workshop (more…)

Trafficking of Persons (Prevention, Protection and Rehabilitation) Bill, 2018: A Pressing Need of the Hour

By Shivangi Singh, Amity Law School, Lucknow.

Trafficking of persons is a serious crime and a grave violation of human rights. Every year, thousands of men, women and children fall into the hands of traffickers, in their own countries and abroad. Almost every country in the world is affected by trafficking, whether as a country of origin, transit or destination for victims. (more…)

Supreme Court rules on protecting Minor Wives

By Arifa Khan, Post Graduate College of Law, Osmania University, Hyderabad.

The Supreme Court, in a landmark judgment, affirmed that sexual intercourse with a minor wife is rape, where consent is immaterial. The judgment came on a petition filed by an NGO- Bachpan Bachao Andolan (BBA) run by Nobel Prize winner Kailash Satyarthi to examine the conflict of Section 375 of Indian Penal Code (IPC) with Protection of Children from Sexual Offences (POCSO) Act, 2012. The Court struck down Exception 2 to Section 375 of IPC, which exempts marital rape of girls between the age of 15 and 18 from the purview of rape. The POCSO Act has determined the age of consent to be 18 years which cannot be reduced, the court ruled. The Court Bench, comprising Justice Madan B Lokur and Justice Deepak Gupta, said that the exception to the rape law was contrary to the philosophy of other statutes and violates the bodily integrity of a girl child. The discrimination between a married girl child and an unmarried girl child is artificial. “A child remains a child whether she is described as a street child or a surrendered child or an abandoned child or an adopted child. Similarly, a child remains a child whether she is a married child or an unmarried child or a divorced child or a separated or widowed child.”, Justice Lokur wrote. (more…)