Symposium on Public Policy: Urbanisation and Environmental Policies

LexQuest Foundation, in collaboration with Legal Desire Insights, is organizing an immersive one-day public policy symposium, for students and young professionals.

The Symposium aims to reflect on the environmental policies and analyze their impact concerning the contemporary urban growth landscape of our country. The discussions and presentations will focus on the need to better the present legislative framework and to fill the prevalent policy gaps.  (more…)

Understanding the Policy Cycle in the Indian Context

By Elizabath Pappachan, Indian Institute of Technology Madras.

Policy is a course of action, selected from various alternatives, that an individual or an organisation adopts, which influences the present and future decision making. Policy cycle is the most optimal model through which policies are made, put into action and evaluated. It is described usually in six stages, which are: agenda setting, policy formulation, adoption, implementation, evaluation and policy maintenance. It is understood as a cycle, as the outcome of the implementation of the policy will help in determining any alteration in the existing policy or the creation of a new one. (more…)

The Policy Troupe: Chamba Deliberation

Learnings at The Policy Troupe: Chamba Deliberation (1st-2nd June, 2019)

We were at Chamba on the 1st and 2nd of June, 2019 for the second edition of The Policy Troupe. The city is spread out on both sides of the ‘Chaugan’ with an outstanding view of the snow capped mountains at the farther end of the street. The market area running adjacent to the District Court and several government offices makes the place look self sufficient. However, owing to the poor access, connectivity and a lack of basic amenities in the city, it’s easy to understand why Chamba is recognised as one of the most backward Districts of India. (more…)

What connotes Public Policy?

By Lakshmi Kailasan, Vivekananda Institute of Professional Studies, New Delhi.

Public Policy helps in removing deficiencies and improving conditions in a particular area of interest to the public. It helps the policy making agencies to assess public dealing methods and leads to an advancement of public administration. It further helps to examine what the government is doing, the procedure adopted by it for the same and its administration. Public policy may take the form of programmes, projects, budget allocations etc. 

Policy science was first developed by Daniel Lerner and Harold D. Lasswell in the year 1951 and is concerned with social consequences and policy implications. It is a multi-method problem and future oriented approach aimed at general promotion of social welfare. Policies concern themselves with a wide array of issues such as civil rights, poverty, environmental issues, unemployment and international trade etc. The dependence on economics for formulation of policies was at a later stage diluted to consider other disciplines which helped in a better understanding of societal needs. (more…)

Learnings at The Policy Troupe: Almora Deliberation (28th-29th July, 2018)

By Tanya Chandra, Founder, LexQuest Foundation.

When you enter Almora, the District Headquarters of the Kumaon region, you will see prosperity, abled infrastructure and globalization all wrapped into one, amidst the serenity of the green hills that envelop this Himalayan town. Old colonial buildings, streets swarmed with traditional local delicacies and a whole lot of well maintained government offices, well kept government schools, scattering of ill-conceived primary private schools and a large number of public toilets; all on the same street that caters to the outsiders with its endless hotels, modest eateries and a trail of noisy vehicles. (more…)

Government to the Rescue of Domestic Workers

By Arifa Khan, Post Graduate College of Law, Osmania University, Hyderabad.

The exploitation of women and children domestic workers is regularly reported and with no rights protecting them. Most of the domestic help have become contemporary slaves. They are everywhere, in our homes, around small dhabas, tea stalls and working in every menial job possible. They work but are not considered as a part of the ‘services providing community’. They are paid very less, and many a times abused and met with physical ill-treatment. Hundreds of thousands of them endure untold suffering because of their perceived subordination due to caste, class and simply because of what they do for a living. Abuses range from underpaid wages to forced labour, physical violence, starvation and even death. Many women and children are trafficked and exploited by the placement agencies, which operate openly without any form of restrictions and regulations. (more…)