Working Document on Sustainable Reforms: Education for Livelihood in the Hilly Regions

To increase youth engagement in the policy making process, The Policy Troupe transcended the length and breadth of Almora, Uttarakhand, and was exposed to real people and problems through interrogations, observations and interactions.

Amidst the picturesque landscape of Almora, lies the widely prevalent complexity of extending education for livelihood, more so, when mountains prove to be one of the most difficult terrains with limited sources of income and very few viable employment opportunities. In this regard, finding long lasting solutions to resolve the following issues, is the need of the hour: (more…)

The Immorality of Child Labour

By Sonali Bhatnagar, University of Petroleum and Energy Studies, Dehradun.

Everything has been said already; but as

No one listens, we must always begin again.

                                                                                               -Andre Gide

What is Child Labour? Child labour is commonly defined as work done by children under the age of 18 years that may be harmful to their physical, emotional, intellectual and social development[1]. Is not a recent phenomenon and again, not confined to a particular country. More than 200 million[2] children around the world today are deprived of a childhood. Forced to work in fields, mines and factories, many children’s plight is highly visible. But many more children suffer in the hidden dimensions of child labour, such as domestic work, sexual exploitation, human trafficking and slavery. Today, one out of every seven children in the world is involved in child Labour[3]. Child labour covers every non-school going child irrespective of whether the child is engaged in wage or non-wage work; whether he or she is working for their family; whether employed in hazardous or non-hazardous occupations; whether employed on a daily or on a contract basis or as a bonded laborers[4]. Child labour has a long history; it exists in various forms such as street trading, gardening, child caring, handicrafts, prostitution and trafficking and factors such as poverty, ignorance, culture, corruption, ineffective laws and the lack of will to enforce them, are some causes of child labour. (more…)

Right to Education: An Analysis

By Sanya Darakhshan Kishwar, Central University of Bihar, Gaya and Sagarika Chandel, KIIT School Of Law, Bhubaneswar.

The right to education is a universal entitlement to education, recognized in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights as a human right that includes the right to free, compulsory primary education for all, an obligation to develop secondary education accessible to all, in particular by the progressive introduction of free secondary education, as well as an obligation to develop equitable access to higher education, ideally by the progressive introduction of free higher education.

Check out this interesting Power Point Presentation explaining the ins and outs of RTE: (more…)

Right to Education in the context of Child Labor: An Analysis

By Rohin Bhansali, Jindal Global Law School, Sonepat.

Child labor is widespread and bad for development, both that of the individual child and of the society and economy in which she or he lives. If allowed to persist to the current extent, child labor will prevent the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals of halving poverty and achieving Education for All.

Child labor is one of the biggest problems faced by world today. According to UNICEF, a staggering number of 250 million children aged 2 to 17 are subjected to child labor worldwide. Child labor is defined by many organizations as “any kind of work for children that harms them or exploits them in some way may it be physically, mentally, morally or by depriving a child of education”. Child labor is a social menace in many parts of the world, especially developing countries. There is a widespread practice of child labor in places like agriculture, factories, mining, and quarrying etc. (more…)

Unrecognised Schools: Are they really a problem?

By Siddhant Sharma, Amity Law School, Jaipur.

A school is deemed to be unrecognised when it does not fulfill the unrealistic infrastructure requirements and teacher salary scales that the government demands as a prerequisite for recognition. Such schools are unaided by the government but might get donations from private donors or organisations.[i]

These low cost private schools have serious implications on the right to education of low income families or poor families. (more…)