The Scheduled Tribes and Other Traditional Forest Dwellers (Recognition of Forest Rights) Act, 2006

India’s colonial and post-colonial government systematically denied millions of tribal and forest-dwelling communities’ rights to their forest lands and resources. As a result of protracted grassroots struggle, the Scheduled Tribes, and Other Traditional Forest Dwellers (Recognition of Forest Rights) Act, 2006, also known as the Forests Rights Act (FRA), 2006 is a remarkable piece of legislation recognizing the individual and community rights of forest-dwelling and tribal communities. It sought to correct the ‘historic injustice’ faced by these communities integrating conservation and livelihoods. (more…)

2nd National Environmental Law and Policy Essay Writing Competition, 2021

Institutions such as CSOs and pressure groups have played a major role in raising ecological consciousness among people. However, their impact has not been greatly felt at the macro level as they struggle to voice their objections against the popular narrative of the human necessity for development. The failure of market forces, in considering the environmental consequences of their actions advocates the importance of policy intervention. Thus the need for policy-driven conservation efforts, duly supplemented by citizen activism, cannot be undermined. (more…)

Summary Note: Symposium on Climate Change Mitigation Policies

Organised on: 29th November, 2020 

We, at LexQuest Foundation (LQF), organized the second edition of the Symposium on Public Policy, with the theme Climate Change Mitigation Policies, on the 29th of November 2020. Considering the pandemic and the limitations it has put on our mobility, the Symposium was held on a virtual platform. It aimed to reflect on aspects that are affected by climate change or have been an outcome of it. The Symposium comprised four sessions that facilitated the exchange of ideas and experiences of different speakers with the participants. The event was moderated by our Co-Founder & Executive Director, Tanya Chandra. (more…)

A much needed rehaul for India’s Agricultural Policies?

Information about the Issue:

On 27th September 2020, the Government of India brought in the Farmers’ Produce and Commerce (Promotion and Facilitation) Act, 2020 (hereinafter, referred to as the Act) which introduced a pivotal change in India’s agricultural policies. The Act, essentially, aims to provide freedom of choice to the farmers and traders in selling and purchasing farmers’ produce through alternative trading channels and increasing competition in the market. Thus, it allows for barrier-free trade of farmers’ produce outside the physical premises of the markets notified under the various State Agricultural Produce Marketing Committee laws (APMC laws).  (more…)

Civic Architects: The Policy Generation Group

In a democracy, people and their well being is at the core of an exemplary public policy mechanism, which is why proactive mass action can determine the fate of the policies that the State formulates. It is thus crucial that people demand sustainable solutions for existing concerns that deserve carefully crafted policies.

We believe that in the world’s largest democracy, effective public participation can turn policy making into a transparent and accountable process where the government can acknowledge issues that people heed and demand to be resolved. 

In our endeavour to unravel the complexity of Public Policy and expand the scope of public awareness and education in policy making, we are organising ‘Civic Architects’, a first of its kind Policy Workshop, in collaboration with The Economics Society, SRCC. (more…)

Clean and Affordable Energy-The Way Forward for India

Sustainable Development Goals were adopted in the UN Sustainable Development Summit, 2015 by all member countries of the United Nations. Countries agreed upon The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, known as ‘Transforming Our World’, which is a shared blueprint for the development and prosperity of people and the planet. It comprises 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) which are to be achieved by all countries by 2030. These goals provide a holistic approach to move towards sustainable development covering poverty alleviation, health, education, growth, clean energy, and other areas. Certain targets and indicators have been agreed upon to quantify the progress towards these goals.  (more…)

Climate Change & Food Policies in the age of Social Media

 

 

If the current policies of India are to be critically examined, the response aims to focus on short-term and ad-hoc goals rather than long term sustainable solutions. Current social protection programmes are deemed expensive in nature and are based on a narrow understanding of people’s need. An important factor in the adaptation process is to measure the concrete effects of climate change on food production and agriculture. A deep understanding of how these effects play out on different aspects of food policy is what is essential for the country to avoid a national level food crisis. (more…)

Goa: Surging Tourists and Dwindling Beauty

By Akshat Jain, Madras School of Economics, Tamil Nadu.

Anna decided to quit her desk job in UK in 2012 and become a digital nomad permanently living in Goa. She was amazed by the sun-kissed beaches, vibrant environment and the multi-cultural society of Goa. Like Anna, thousands of foreign tourists come to the “Rome of the East” every year, seeking an experience of a lifetime. Goa has been a top tourist destination in India for both foreign as well as domestic travelers for decades. Since 2012, as per the data issued by the Department of Tourism in Goa, there has been an increase of 187% in the total number of tourists in the State. Such an exponential rise in the popularity of the State among tourists has harmed its environment and has disturbed the ecological balance. The serene beaches are now muddled with plastic and used bottles. Amid the generation of more than 7 million tonnes of waste per year, Goa has now declared a war on pollution by pledging to go plastic-free by the year 2022. (more…)

Milking the Symbiosis Dry: Ecological Damage of the Dairy Industry in India

By Ishita Puri, St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai

Fritjof Capra, in his book The Systems View of Life remarked “As the twenty-first century unfolds, it is becoming more and more evident that the major problems of our time – energy, the environment, climate change, food security, financial security – cannot be understood in isolation. They are systemic problems, which means that they are all interconnected and interdependent.” His assessment of ecological issues and conservation could not have been more accurate. No effective solution can be realised if humanity continues to view the ecological issues of Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, exploitation of animals and poverty alleviation in vacuum. (more…)